Category Archives: Natural Disasters

Dan Garodnick: East Side Responds to Hurricane Sandy

Hurricane Sandy outdid even the most aggressive projections of its impact on New York. In my district on the East Side of Manhattan, and some of the West 50s, we had severe flooding throughout Zones A and B, power and heat outages that lasted for over a week, and—as if that weren’t bad enough—a crane that hung precariously in Midtown, forcing residents from their homes.

The situation presented an important opportunity for local government to respond. The flooding left thousands of my constituents stranded in their apartments and in need of assistance, particularly in Peter Cooper Village, Stuyvesant Town and Waterside Plaza, home to nearly 30,000 right next to the East River. Residents—who include me and my family—lacked electricity, heat and hot water, and just as dangerously, any telephone service.

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Stuyvesant Town/Peter Cooper Village Residents to get Rent Abatement for Days Without Heat, Power

On Tuesday afternoon, Andrew MacArthur, managing director of CWCapital, issued the following email to Stuyvesant Town/Peter Cooper Village residents announcing there would be rent rebates (via credit) for days without heat, electricity and elevator service.

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CWCapital/CompassRock: All Stuy Town buildings have power, as do all but four in Peter Cooper Village

The following alert was sent out via email to Stuyvesant Town/Peter Cooper Village residents by management on the latest updates on electricity and elevators as well as knocking door to door to check on residents. Additionally, ST/PCV polling places are open tomorrow.

RESIDENT NOTICE

NOVEMBER 5 UPDATE

We are pleased to report additional significant progress with respect to the restoration of utility services that was made last night and this morning.

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RESIDENT NOTICE – NOVEMBER 3 EVENING UPDATE

We are extraordinarily pleased that much of the community has had power restored over the past 24 hours. Unfortunately, much of Peter Cooper Village and certain buildings in Stuyvesant Town, primarily along Avenue C, remain without power at this time. The reason for this is that the electrical equipment in the basements of the effected buildings were submerged in salt water during the flood. This exposure to salt water has created damage which makes it unsafe to turn on the electricity.

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Explosions rock manhole covers as Con Ed restores power in Manhattan

Officials said the explosions occurred when the utility started restoring electricity and the current hit salt on the power lines. The salt was the remnant of a 10-foot wave of East River water that crashed through the complex at the height of the storm Monday.

Several small explosions rattled storm-weary residents of Peter Cooper Village late Friday night and even blew two manhole covers as Con Edison was restoring power to the area. The latest apparent nastiness from Hurricane Sandy — days after the nightmare storm — caused no injuries, according to paramedics and Con Ed officials on the scene.

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RESIDENT NOTICE – NOVEMBER 2 EVENING UPDATE

Please be advised that as of 6:30pm this evening Con Edison confirmed that power has begun to be restored to the grid which includes Peter Cooper Village Stuyvesant Town.

Since the storm we have been working tirelessly to address life safety issues and to prepare the property for the restoration of the services.

Over the course of the past 48 hours, we have been able to pump the majority of the standing water out of the basement areas which has allowed us to commence an inventory of damaged equipment. Our preliminary inspection and assessment has confirmed that many buildings will regain full utility service once Con Edison is able to restore services. Unfortunately, we have also determined that a number of buildings have sustained extensive mechanical damage which may delay restoration of utilities even after Con Edison restores those services. We are providing you with the following updates immediately so that you can plan accordingly, though addressing these problems will remain our top priority. We would also caution that the assessment below is preliminary and additional issues may surface over the coming days that will change the information below. We will continue to keep our residents updated with respect to any changes in the information outlined below.

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Stuy Town parkers driven mad after cars are totaled by Sandy

Stuy Town parkers driven mad after cars are totaled by SandyStuyvesant Town parkers were feeling “garage rage” after Hurricane Sandy wrecked their cars in a place they were assured would be safe during the storm.

Angry and concerned car owners gathered outside Garage 5, on Avenue C near 15th St., on Tuesday afternoon, but it was gated and there were no attendants in sight. Inside the garage a white car could be seen sitting in water about 3 feet high.

A GoodYear tow truck operator whose name patch read “Bernard” let them know they were in for the worst due to the salt water’s effects on their wheels.

“Every car out here — totaled,” he said. “If it ever starts running again, it’ll have electronic problems for a long time.”

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Dozens of seniors feel trapped inside Stuy Town after storm

Dozens of seniors feel trapped inside Stuy Town after stormDesperate for medication, heat and electricity, older residents are struggling to adjust to life without the basic goods they need to survive.

Scores of seniors are stranded in Stuy Town — and they’re desperate for medication, heat and electricity.

A four-hour walk through one 14-story building in the mammoth complex found numerous elderly residents stuck in their homes and feeling as if they have no way to escape.

“We have no family, so there’s nowhere else to go,” said Paula Nayowitz, 90.

She said she and her husband, Al Nayowitz, 91, were cold and hungry in their apartment on the seventh floor.

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Hot Water Restored Throughout Stuyvesant Town

STUYVESANT TOWN — Hot water has been restored at Stuyvesant Town.

Con Edison reported that steam, which affords the luxury of a hot shower, has returned to 48 buildings in lower Manhattan, including all those in Stuyvesant Town affected by the outage following this weekend’s storm.

A Con Ed spokesman said the utility is still working to restore steam to two buildings on Water Street, but declined to say exactly when that work would be completed.
The outage started Saturday afternoon, and Con Ed initially estimated that total steam-service restoration could take until Tuesday night. The shutdown was a precautionary measure, meant to protect the city’s steam lines from potential flood damage due to Hurricane Irene, officials said.

On Sunday after the storm, several Stuy Town residents said they were thankful cold showers were the only issues to contend with.

“It’s a little annoying, but it’s definitely livable,” said Debra Cardona, 53. “It could have been so much worse,” added 50-year-old Darin DePaul.

But as the outage stretched into Monday, residents took to Facebook and Twitter to express their frustration. “Why the hell do I not have hot water yet?” Peter_Whalen tweeted on Monday. “Oh hell no #stuyvesanttown, still no hot water????!” added akaMERRY.

By late Monday evening, hot water service began to return across the complex. Residents updated the progression on Stuy Town’s Lux Living Facebook page as it unfolded, with comments reporting hot water updates building by building.

Source

Stuy Town Residents Could Be Without Hot Water Until Tuesday

MANHATTAN — Hundreds of Manhattan residents are still taking cold showers thanks to Hurricane Irene.

Fifty buildings in Manhattan, including parts of Stuyvesant Town, have had no hot water since Saturday afternoon, when Con Edison cut off steam lines to prevent them from being damaged by flooding.

Con Ed crews are now working round-the-clock to inspect the pipes and turn the steam back on, but the service may not be restored until Tuesday evening, said John Miksad, Con Ed’s senior vice president of electric operations.

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